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Phishing

Phishing scams are attempts by scammers to trick you into giving out personal information such as your bank account numbers, passwords and credit card numbers.

How does this scam work?

A scammer contacts you out of the blue pretending to be from a legitimate business such a bank, telephone or internet service provider. You may be contacted by email, social media, phone call, or text message.

Clues for spotting a fake email

The scammer asks you to provide or confirm your personal details. For example, the scammer may say that the bank or organisation is verifying customer records due to a technical error that wiped out customer data. Or, they may ask you to fill out a customer survey and offer a prize for participating.

Alternatively, the scammer may alert you to 'unauthorised or suspicious activity on your account'. You might be told that a large purchase has been made in a foreign country and asked if you authorised the payment. If you reply that you didn't, the scammer will ask you to confirm your credit card or bank details so the 'bank' can investigate. In some cases the scammer may already have your credit card number and ask you to confirm your identity by quoting the 3 or 4 digit security code printed on the card.

Phishing messages are designed to look genuine, and often copy the format used by the organisation the scammer is pretending to represent, including their branding and logo. They will take you to a fake website that looks like the real deal, but has a slightly different address. For example, if the legitimate site is 'www.realbank.com.au', the scammer may use an address like 'www.reallbank.com'.

If you provide the scammer with your details online or over the phone, they will use them to carry out fraudulent activities, such as using your credit cards and stealing your money.


List of Scams

  • qantascss
    17 August 2017
    Qantas Customer Satisfaction Survey

    Qantas Frequent Flyers should be aware of a bogus email to ‘complete the survey’ and ‘claim a reward’ - it a phishing scam.

    Read More...
  • A big pile of Australian $100 notes
    Third party suppliers scam

    Fake 'suppliers' are targetting WA organisations, providing 'new' bank account details for payments and stealing the money.

    Read More...
  • collision-repair-car
    Car Crash Compensation Phone Scam

    Scammers are offering compensation for a car accident in an attempt to obtain personal information from victims.

    Read More...
  • blackmail_email
    Online blackmail scam targets students

    Students are being warning about an online blackmail scam, whereby scammers are trying to extort money from students visiting essay chat forums. Scammers gain personal information and create spoof emails from universities in order to trap students into paying up big bucks.

    Read More...
  • Jet looking at the keyboard of a silver laptop
    myGov fake emails

    WA ScamNet regularly receives reports about scam emails that claim to be from the Australian Tax Office (ATO).

    Usually the email’s offering a tax refund or it might be asking you to update your details.

    The body of the email will ask you to click a link – never do this as this is how the scammers will get your details.

    Read More...
  • telephone headset
    Commerce government officer impersonations

    Scammers are pretending to be Commerce officers in email and phone scams.

    Read More...
  • A blue house outline with a dollar sign in ita
    Real estate scam attempt thwarted

    Consumer Protection and WA Police have issued a joint warning to real estate agents after scammers tried to sell a Perth home without the owner’s knowledge. An overseas organised criminal network began the process of selling the home by emailing the Property Manager, using a fake email address which mirrored the true owner’s name. Thankfully the agent followed WA Government guidelines which were introduced following the fraudulent sale of a Karrinyup home in 2010 and a Ballajura home in 2011.

    Read More...
  • A crook climbing out of a phone
    Voucher Prize scams

    Beware of “voucher prize” scam text messages. Do not to respond to text messages which claim you have won a voucher, In fact you may be entering into an expensive mobile premium SMS service.

    Read More...
  • text messageSmall
    SMS competition & trivia scams

    An SMS competition or SMS trivia scam usually arrives as a text message and may encourage you to enter a competition for a great prize.The scammers make money by charging extremely high rates for the messages you send, and any further messages they send to you. These charges could be as high as $4 for each message sent and/or received.

    Read More...
  • invoice in a red circle with a line through it.
    False Invoices

    Businesses are often targeted by scammers hoping that busy firms may sign invoices without checking their authenticity. Sometimes these fake invoices are for a listing in a publication which the business hasn’t ordered.

    Read More...
  • telephone headset
    Telemarketing

    Telemarketing or ‘Cold calling’ is an unexpected or unsolicited telephone call offering investments or financial advice. The investments they offer usually guarantee high returns or encourage you to invest in overseas companies.

    Read More...
  • Western Australian Government logo
    Australian Fair Trading

    What a cheek! Cyber criminals aim to steal your identity by putting out an email confirming your “complaint” about identity theft!

    Read More...
  • A laptop computer with an open CD drive (with a CD in it); the screen has an image of a mountain scene.
    Confirmation Orders

    An email arrives confirming your order for a lap top computer or other product or service. The email attachment provides further details of your order. Hang on! You haven’t ordered a laptop. You click on the attachment to find out more information, fearing that somebody has stolen your credit card information to place the order. And that’s exactly what the scammers are relying upon

    Read More...
  • A large wheel lock on a bank vault
    Hang Seng Bank

    Con artists posing as employees and senior executives of the Hang Seng Bank are trying to rope you into becoming a ‘partner’ in a business transaction.

    Read More...
  • Seek logo
    SEEK job scams

    The operators of these sophisticated scams use a well-known legitimate job vacancy website to hook you in to revealing your details.

    Read More...
  • A cardboard box with the words “same day delivery” written on it
    TNT Courier Service

    Scammers are using the names, brands and logos of well-known companies, including courier services, to hook you into advance fee fraud and lottery swindles. 

    Read More...

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