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Psychic & clairvoyant

Psychic and clairvoyant scams are designed to trick you into giving away your money, usually offering ‘help’ in exchange for a fee.

How this scam works

Psychic and clairvoyant scammers approach you by post, email, telephone or even face-to-face to foreshadow a positive upcoming event or claiming that you are in some sort of trouble and offering a solution.

This solution could be winning lottery numbers, a lucky charm, the removal of a curse or jinx, or ongoing protection. The scammer will tell you that they will help you in return for a fee. If you refuse to pay, some scammers will threaten to invoke a curse or bad luck charm on you.

Scammers may try and talk you into buying a lucky charm or secret of wealth, and once you have paid, will send you a worthless item or nothing at all. Alternatively, the scammer may warn you of a false future event and then promise to protect you from that event in return for ongoing payments.

These kinds of scams can also lead to your name and contact details being put onto a ‘victim list’ which will result in you receiving further scam approaches, for example unexpected prize or lottery scams or inheritance scams.

Remember, the psychic or clairvoyant may try to convince you that their insights are genuine by telling you something about yourself. Ask yourself if they are telling you something that is general and could be true about anyone. They may also tell you something about yourself that you mentioned previously or that they gathered from another source, such as personal details you posted on a social networking website.


List of Scams

  • Jupiter Group clairvoyant scams

    A US-based publishing house called Jupiter Group is behind a number of clairvoyant scams arriving in mailboxes across Western Australia. 

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  • Example of a Joseph von Jalan scam letter
    Joseph von Jalan - Clairvoyant

    At WA ScamNet we didn’t need a crystal ball to know that we’d be naming and shaming another clairvoyant scam; even though we’ve issued warnings about 90 or so previously. A number of copies of a letter and voucher from Joseph von Jalan have been sent to Consumer Protection by concerned Western Australians who felt vulnerable members of the community may be duped; WA ScamNet agrees.

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  • A photo of Clairvoyant Monsieur Patrick
    Monsieur Patrick

    Clairvoyant Monsieur Patrick clearly did not foresee a WA ScamNet warning in his own future when he decided to peddle his ‘psychic powers’ to Western Australian consumers.

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  • A woman sitting crossed legged holding a bowl of yogurt in one hand and a bowl of strawberries in the other
    The Society For Health And Longevity

    Want to turn back the clock so you look, feel and actually are biologically 20 years younger? Don’t we all?! But The Society for Health and Longevity in Las Vegas is not the way to go about it, despite how hard they’ll try to convince you they are.

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  • A number of tarot cards laid out in a fan ( the fool, the moon, the queen of wands, the sun and the ten of cups)
    Amanda Kane

    A letter from someone claiming to be Amanda Kane, clairvoyant, says that she wants to help the recipient by making a generous offer. She claims she will send you a cheque for $39,000 plus the “Great Secret Wish Amplifier” called a “Divinor” and a magic necklace. All this for the “tiny sum” of $60. It does not take any magical powers to foresee you will not receive any money.

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  • A pink crystal ball on a gold stand
    Amy Palmer

    Who is clairvoyant Amy Palmer? she a trademark of the marketing company, Promo Direct, who wants you to spend good money on useless numerological and other psychic paraphernalia.

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  • A photograph of Angela
    Angela Almera

    Clairvoyant Angela Almera, from the Netherlands, is retiring and wants you to be the very last person she is ever going to help to become a winner. But when we did a search for her name on the Internet, the first item was a warning from the New Zealand Ministry of Consumer Affairs about her.

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  • An illuminated manuscript style drawing of an angel in a yellow archway
    Angele and Angelina

    Angele and Angelina may call themselves the “two angels of light”. But WA ScamNet refers to them as the “evil duo of disappointment” because that’s all you will get if you respond to this letter.

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  • A number of tarot cards laid out in a fan ( the fool, the moon, the queen of wands, the sun and the ten of cups)
    Angelique de Succes

    “You are one of the 12 people whose vibrations match the secret” so says clairvoyant Angelique de Succes in a personally addressed letter. Hang on Angelique, what about the hundreds of other Western Australians you have sent the same letter to? Are they also part of the chosen 12?  Angelique can reveal to you the “most important secret in the world”. Why pay $65 to Angelique when WA ScamNet holds the key to this secret – it’s a SCAM.

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  • A black burnt tree in the middle of a bush fire, the rest of the image is completely engulfed in fire.
    Angelo Da Vinco

    Clairvoyant Angelo Da Vinco wants to protect you from worldwide danger and disaster – at a price of $56. But Angelo da Vinco, who will protect us from scamming fake psychics like you? This appalling letter is trying to scare you into handing over your money.

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  • A black and white photograph of Anna Pfeiffe
    Anna Pfeiffer

    Anna Pfeiffer claims she is known as “Madame Luck” because of her uncanny ability to predict lucky lottery numbers. Anna has received some press coverage in England – but all for the wrong reasons. The press coverage relates to warnings issued by UK authorities about Anna being a psychic scam.

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  • A male and female worry doll
    Antonio Divito

    Antonio Divito claims the Divito Institute is the only institution authorised to distribute the famous “worry dolls” (magical dolls of happiness) of Guatemala for the princely sum of $46. Antonio Divito must be living in dream world because we found lots of websites selling the dolls for as little as $2 a set of six – including sites whose products are sourced from members of the Fair Trade Federation.

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  • An illuminated manuscript style drawing of an angel in a yellow archway
    L'Assemblee Des Anges (The Assembly of Angels)

    Do you believe in the tooth fairy, Santa Claus or the Easter bunny? If not, you shouldn’t believe in The Assembly of Angels on earth either.

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  • Australian money spinning down the drain
    David Lopez

    Like several other advanced fee frauds, scammers use the death of individuals to rope in consumers to part with their hard-earned savings.

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  • A pink crystal ball on a gold stand
    Blanche Calmette, Clairvoyant

    Dear Blanche Calmette, clairvoyant When reading the future, did you predict that Western Australian consumers would send their letters from you to WA ScamNet? We think your letter is about developing a “sucker list” to sell to other mail order sharks. But you already knew that.


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  • A black and white image of a Buddhist monk
    Bon Po

    Tibetan Buddhist monks emphasize spiritual growth over material wealth or gain. So why would a genuine Tibetan monk try to sell you a prayer wheel solely designed to make you a multi-millionaire through games of chance?

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  • An antique oil lamp with dark blue smoke.
    Cabinet, Gerson and Moris

    This is the genie of all scams. It’s just a shame we can’t rub the bottle and make it disappear.

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  • A photograph of Christie
    Christie Owen

    According to Christie, you have been selected to be the recipient of “Special Grand Celestial File of Fortune and Good Luck called Good Fortune at the click of the fingers”. Fine print conditions inside the envelope make it clear that the aim is to promote and sell the company’s products. 

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  • Green stone runes
    Claire Bonheur

    “Blazing luck at “chance” games ... Entrancing magic for found again love … Dazzling financial success in every domain … Cosmic protection against harmful influences ... Power of supreme influence over beings, things and destiny.” Be warned that this is only one example of a Claire Bonhuer letter. There may be other letters peddling similar useless lucky charms and paraphernalia. Don’t be taken in by this letter. It’s just a scam.

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  • a black and white photograph of the countess
    Countess Maria Romanova

    Countess Maria Romanova has your best interests at heart, or so she would have you believe. Countess Maria describes her luck and fortune secret as infallible and “guarantees” the accuracy of her predictions, or your money back.  But don’t rely on it. Take Maria’s advice and the only thing you can be assured of is that you won’t see your money again

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  • A gold cross on a chain
    Djima

    Djima is a self professed clairvoyant of money based games and is urgently asking you to send him money. Don’t reply to this scam, if Djima really does exist his visions of financial gain are probably of his own wealth from unfortunate people falling for his tricks.   If you have purchased a Radiant cross then take him up on his offer to buy it back and let ScamNet know how you go. 

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  • Green stone runes
    Donna Esmeralda

    Donna Esmeralda has an impressive stash of cash to give to you but first you must send her money.  It begs the question – if she does have some money to send why doesn’t she just take out the $49 fee she requires and send you the rest?

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  • A dark blue car (2007 lotus elise)
    Dr Grant -& Foundation of Multi Millionaires - Chel

    Financial security is something we all want with enough cash to buy the car, house and wardrobe full of designer clothes.

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  • A photograph of Edmond
    Edmond de Valles

    Mr de Valles’ four-page diatribe from Geneva has the familiar promise of love, money and happiness ever after. This is an all too familiar theme.  We predict that all you will get for your money is some coloured stones.

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  • A hand holding a picture with blue light coming from behind the picture
    Esmeralda Wicca

    Esmeralda Wicca, from Switzerland, promises she can supply the numbers needed to win Lotto.Like all psychic scams, Esmeralda claims to have had a vision which revealed your name and address. She makes no mention of the mailing list where she really got your name.

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  • An illuminated manuscript style drawing of an angel in a yellow archway
    Esperanza

    An angel appeared to Dutch clairvoyant Esperanza and told her to take a pilgrimage to the holy place of Saint-Jacques de Compestelle. WA ScamNet has its own guardian Angel that, free of charge and without obligation, advises you: “Don’t pay $35 for a stone and a false promise”.

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  • Female hands holding a ball of white light with a blue background
    Eva du Maurier - Clairvoyant Medium

    If you've received a full colour letter complete with this charlatan's photo telling you the astral conjunction is foretelling a fortune heading your way, keep your $65 and spirit the letter to us so we can share the good news with her that we are still watching.

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  • a tropical island in the middle of a light blue sea
    Friedrich Mueller Gift Distribution

     The fine print for this offer is in grey on the inside of the envelope! Wow! The promoter apparently expects 50,000 responses from nine countries. There is one each of a car, a kitchen and a savings account to be won. But everyone who enters wins the “cruise” (six hours each way) plus eight nights’ accommodation – but is responsible for airfares to and from Florida.

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  • Bronze Chinese coin
    Gabriel D'Angelo

    Gabriel claims to be an extra-lucid clairvoyant with paranormal phenomena. He personally knows your situation and has foreseen great monetary wins – but only if you purchase his magical talisman and good luck charms. In fact, you are just a name on a mailing list.

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  • A green leaf
    Giacomo d'Albi & the Lotus of Miracles

    "I am instructed to tell you some news that will amaze you and fill you with joy. You and I will be the only ones to know why you have deserved this Gift of Life."

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  • Australian money raining on a man holding an umbrella
    Gladys Holle

    You’ll need a magnifying glass to read the fine print which states that this letter does not contain any firm offer to claim a prize. It is an advertising document presented in “an appealing manner” and the object of the game is to promote the sale of the magic fortune crystal.

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  • Magic tools: a pink candle, wooden and crystal wand, pentagram, tarot cards, crystal and a bell on a purple background.
    GSP Psychic Scams - various

    A range of scams involving bogus psychics and clairvoyants are flooding letter boxes with the only guarantee about the receiver’s future being that they will be out of pocket if they respond.  The various scams offer to give the lucky recipients winning lottery numbers, good luck charms to improve financial fortunes and ways to unlock the secrets of winning games of chance. But not for free of course!  All scams suggest a payment of good faith ranging from $29.90 to $100.

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  • A photograph of Helena Bright
    Helena Bright

    For a token $29.90, Helena Bright, a graduate of the renowned World Institute of Applied Para-Psychology and a flash medium clairvoyant since birth, promises you will win so much money you will not know where to put it! You have been chosen. Helena might have a heart of gold in wanting to pay her mate a slice of the action, but we reckon you would be better off leaving this scam well alone.

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  • Female hands holding a ball of white light with a blue background
    Honorine and Gerald

    Your aura is in chromatic depression and only psychic soul mates Honorine and Gerald can help. What is chromatic depression? WA ScamNet has never heard of it but apparently it has something to do with the aura losing colour and becoming totally transparent. Poor aura! Obviously this is another useless psychic scam. WA ScamNet doubts that Honorine and Gerald actually exist.

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  • Test tubes with brightly coloured liquid in them (purple, green, yellow, blue, pink and orange)
    Institute of Experimental Research (I.E.R) Professor Kensington

    Some cases you can count yourself lucky for someone always helping you to financial freedom - but if you have the team at IER (or IEF) on your side your luck has turned sour!

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  • A photograph of Igor in a silver frame
    IGOR PALPUTIN

    Does learning the secret to unlock $377,000 sound tempting? Well, for most people it does. But don’t get sucked in to Igor Palputin’s “vision” to make you rich in less than 37 days

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  •  A photograph of Ian in color
    Ilian Gabriel

    You have been invited to join “The Secret Community of Money from Sumer” which apparently will result in you receiving a “shower of money that rains into your life”. If you send off your money, the only “community” you will be initiated into is the “Community of Scam Victims”.

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  • A yellow envelope seen from behind
    Incentive Merchandise Liquidation

    This company is kindly informing consumers that they have been authorised to receive an RCA 65" television valued at US$4,500 and they can receive it as easily as sending the liquidation fee of just US$29.95.Switch off this offer and keep your money as the close typed small print on the reverse of the form tells you in a round about way that you've got "buckleys" of getting anything even close to $29.95US in value, never mind $4,500US.

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  • Magic tools: a pink candle, wooden and crystal wand, pentagram, tarot cards, crystal and a bell on a purple background.
    Jivana

    Oh, hang on, the Association for the Control of Efficacy of Clairvoyants certainly sounds very impressive and official all that’s pretty meaningless when you think about it. Anybody can get this kind of stuff printed up – crests and stamps and signatures and all, marked as being from an association that doesn’t exist. So don’t be fooled. The creation of an impression of being ‘official’ and legitimate is a standard trick of scammers.

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  • A black and white image of a man praying
    Johann Christensen

    You are one of four people Swiss Astro-numerologist Johann Christensen has chosen to pass on the secret of great wealth.  If Johann knows the valuable alchemic secret and is such a generous soul, why does he need to charge $32 to share it with you? That’s right. This is another pesky psychic scam.

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  • Dark blue Tanzanite Crystal
    Julie Haley

    Dutch star clairvoyant and cosmetologist Julie Haley has chosen you to receive the CristAnandaMagic, a crystal that contains the secret treasures of Ma Ananda Moyi, an Indian woman saint. Fine print at the bottom of the certificate to be returned to Julie states:  “Julie Hayley is not a real person, but a trademark of ‘Calypso’ and the offer made is a commercial proposition.”  Well surprise, surprise!

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  • A photograph of a beared man on a black background
    Krysto De La Tour

    Krysto De La Tour has been extremely busy. This self described ‘jade-eyed clairvoyant’ and medium, operating out of Switzerland, is a prolific letter writer, and he has been targeting Western Australians with predictions of true happiness, success, and unimaginable luck! Without needing to access either your money or personal details, WA ScamNet can also predict your future.  Respond to this persistent shyster, and you’ll be ripped off.

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  • Australian money spinning down the drain
    Lady Mary

    Lady Mary swears that you will be the only winner of the Super Jackpot of $6 million dollars on a set date. It’s a shame she has sent out exactly the same letter to countless other people. Maybe we are all meant to share in lots of $6 million jackpots!

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  • A gold cross on a chain
    Laure Athol

    Just imagine your luck when Laure Athol sends you a personal cheque declaring you the grand winner of $22,250, “the sole grand winner” plucked from the 20 million plus population of Australia. WA ScamNet doesn’t have a crystal ball or psychic powers but believes it is quite plain to see the cheque for $22,250 Ms Athol promises she has written out for you is non-existent.

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  • Two grey haired old ladies with glasses
    Lise and Rose

    Lise and Rose claim to be two “enlightened sisters” of the world of clairvoyance. We think they are two “enlightened sisters” of the world of scams.

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  • A number of tarot cards laid out in a fan ( the fool, the moon, the queen of wands, the sun and the ten of cups)
    Loria Peterson

    Loria Peterson is going to guide you, shoulder you and help you for 122 days – for free all Loria Peterson needed to perform this scam ritual is a computer, a printer, a mailing list, credit card facilities and a vulnerable consumer.

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  • A black spider on a white background
    Madame Arachnea and her psychic Swiss spider

    Madame Arachnea's spider ensnares your winning lottery numbers - or you will be condemned to hell for ignoring the letter. Naturally, this psychic spider did not foretell how many of Madame Arachnea's letters would be sent to WA ScamNet.  Or maybe the spider tricked her with its own web of deceit?

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  • A pottery astrological circle marking the passage of the zodiac signs in gold and blue
    Madame Soleil

    Madame Soleil was a famous French astrologer but the clairvoyant Madame Soleil, who is currently writing to consumers offering 11 exceptional miracles, is not the real Madame Soleil . This is a typical psychic scam full of fake predictions and empty promises.  Be warned that there may be other variations of this letter.

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  • A black and white photograph of Zander
    Maestro Zhandler

    "Protection, Wealth, Joy in Life and Happiness as well as Good Fortune!"  All you have to do to secure the privileges of the Great Secret is return the acceptance form along with $49. Be in no doubt the Grand Master Zhandler is indeed a grand trickster!

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  • A black ghost on a white background
    Magdalena

    Swiss clairvoyant, astro-medium and numerologist Magdalena has a number of different spiels which she uses to try to scam you out of money.

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  • A colour photograph of Maria in a gold frame
    Maina Saha

    Back in 2006 Mala Devi had just come back from the famous ‘Kumba-Mela’ pilgrimage with the only 17 Bracelets of the Sages with 14 magical powers left.  You don’t have to be a clairvoyant to predict that this is a scam.

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  • A black and white photograph depicting two Buddhist monks outside a straw building
    Matre Norbu

    Maetre Norbu and his mini-me evil sidekick Sonam are sending out a poisonous letter designed to scare you into sending money.

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  • An amethyst bead bracelet
    Mala Devi

    Indian clairvoyant Mala Devi has returned from the famous Kumba-Mela pilgrimage with the 17 remaining Bracelets of the Sages with 14 magical powers. It’s a shame that the bracelets can’t protect you from shysters like Mala Devi!

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  • Two gold Spanish coins on a white background
    Marc Smiths

    Poor Marc Smiths. He has won millions with his lucky Glistening Golden Coin. This is a very ham-fisted attempt to con you out of your money by trying to empathise with your circumstances while, at the same time, trying to illicit sympathy for the plight of the Smiths family. This so-called “battler-made-good” even lets you pay your $50 by credit card! How many people do you know have a credit card facility?

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  • A number of tarot cards laid out in a fan ( the fool, the moon, the queen of wands, the sun and the ten of cups)
    Maria de Fortune

    Maria’s letter offers ‘a fairy tale life’. Maria gives an absolute guarantee and offers a refund if you are not completely happy within four months. Do you believe in fairy tales?  Maria is one of many overseas companies who send these types of letters in bulk.  Send them in to us and keep your money in your pocket.

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  • Green stone runes
    Maria de la Vega

    Maria de la Vega claims to be an internationally recognised clairvoyant and grand master of occultism. But WA ScamNet believes Maria is just a figment of the fertile imagination of the scammers behind the black-hearted Blacktacos mail order company.

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  • A black and white photograph of Maria Rosa
    Maria Rosa

    Maria is a typical psychic scam who uses threats and the promises of money to get you to hand over your dollars. New Zealand’s Ministry of Consumer Affairs is also warning its consumers to steer clear of Maria Rosa.

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  • Magic tools: a pink candle, wooden and crystal wand, pentagram, tarot cards, crystal and a bell on a purple background.
    Marie Callas

    Marie Callas claims to be a clairvoyant, medium, numerologist, specialist in astrology and tarot, dowser, author of numerous books and articles, mage, spirit. But Marie has forgotten one important title – prolific psychic scammer.

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  • A square of bright swirling colours (pink, yellow, orange , green, purple and blue) with  small white sparkly stars
    Marie Desperance

    How lucky are you? WA ScamNet suggests not very lucky if you reply and to Mrs Desperance’s request for help to her Swiss address, probably linked to her Swiss bank account.

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  • A pink crystal ball on a gold stand
    Master Zholtan

    Like so many other scams, Zholtan creates a sense of urgency by telling you to reply within 24 hours or you forfeit your chance to be part of the lucky 444. If you participate, by paying up to $125 as a “small symbolic contribution”, Zholtan will not only send you your personal “visionary” numbers but also the precious “Magic-Lotto”, a crystal ball on a stand especially “programmed to unblock [your] chronic bad luck on the lottery”

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  • A gold sun charm on a gold chain on a white background
    Michelle Alby

    Peruvian-born Michelle Alby, from Holland, claims to be one of the greatest clairvoyants of all time and that her gifts are recognised by the scientific community. Do not respond to this letter. It is just another psychic scam. Some scams, like this one, try to scare you into parting with your money. At the end of the day, you will be handing over $98 for hot air and a cheap gold-coloured chain.

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  • A brightly burning fire on a white background
    Mikael

    This is a typical psychic scam letter. Mikael (we doubt that such a person exists) does not know you personally. He has got your name from a mailing list. You are just one of the hundreds of thousands of people who have received the same letter. Do not fall for this sham. If you respond and send off your money, the only thing you will receive is more psychic scam letters.

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  • An antique oil lamp with dark blue smoke.
    Milka Petrovna

    A lucky gambling genie will make all your financial dreams come true, according to the wizard of gambling Milka Petrovna. Forget the lucky gambling genie, if you respond to this letter you will be opening a Pandora’s box of other scams.This scam has a Swiss return mailing address of CH 1172 Bougy Villars. Can’t somebody grant our wish for all psychic scams to disappear!

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  • A pile of books one open on the top
    The NT Society

    You than receive a Booklet that introduces the “10 second miracle” .  According to Jeff Hanson, Director of Membership (or Publisher depending on the letter you receive), the second and final instalment is for the Nuova Tech Discovery book (553 pages) or the Neo-Tech World book (7400) pages that contain the secrets.  And it only costs $192.00 or $196. It takes about 10 seconds to realise that this offer is a scam and will produce no miracles!

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  • A gold sun charm on a gold chain on a white background
    Miss Celeste

    Miss Celeste from Holland claims to be an authentic clairvoyant and “specialist in desperate cases”. The only thing that Miss Celeste is a specialist in is deception.

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  • A pottery astrological circle marking the passage of the zodiac signs in gold and blue
    Miss Malinda

    Miss Malinda also wants to send you your “Complete and Confidential Personal Lunar Revolution Astrological Forecast” which will bring you luck, money and everything you need for complete happiness. The cost is $53. Sounds wonderful until you read the conditions, sneakily printed on the inside of the envelope containing your letter.

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  • Complex mathematical sums
    Monica Goldstein

    This pathetic letter is a load of codswallop! Why does she need to charge you money if she can use the formula to win up to $5 million herself? With $5 million, she could set up a real charity foundation and help the needy rather than scam money off people. The reason she is chasing you for money is that the formula doesn’t work!.” This is a typical psychic scam. Don’t waste your money on this rubbish!

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  • A black and white photograph of Nichel
    Nelchael

    Nelchael, of Switzerland, claims a cheque in the amount of $340,000 will be given to you, in your hands, next month. Nelchael claims he seldom proposes this type of intervention. Try telling that to the thousands of others who also received this mass mail-out. This is a typical psychic scam. None of our contributors have ever received a big lotto win after sending money off to a psychic scam. All they have received is useless trinkets.

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  • A pink crystal ball on a gold stand
    Nostradamus Research Centre

    We can safely predict that the Dear Friends who send $20 to Nostradamus will not have $20. We further predict that they will get lots of mail saying that, for various fees, they can find out if they have already won prizes in overseas lotteries they have not entered. Just amazing! Funny how Nostradamus and his Oracles didn't predict how so many of their Dear Friends would react to a combination of fear and greed - by sending their special invitation to WA ScamNet.

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  • A pile of books one open on the top
    Nuova Tech Society, Neo-Tech Publishing Company

    The Nuova Tech Society, Neo-Tech Society, The NT Society, Neo-Tech Publishing Company Inc and Nuova Tech Publishing Company are one and the same. Same Nevada USA address, same telephone and fax numbers.

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  • A folded newspaper
    Olivia Roy's "Future Newspaper" prize announcement

    The incredible Olivia Roy, a clairvoyant of Lausanne in Switzerland, sent a bunch of our loyal WA ScamNet contributors the front pages of a future newspaper. Each had the headline naming that person as the winner of more than 30 million dollars.

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  • Complex mathematical sums
    Paloma Summer

    Paloma Summer – what a lovely name. Paloma is of Spanish origin meaning dove. Unfortunately, there is nothing dove-like about Paloma Summer, the so-called medium and specialist in the secret science of numbers and lunar magic.

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  • Australian money spinning down the drain
    Paul Ritter

    Paul Ritter says your name is already on a cheque for $12,800 but WA ScamNet is quite convinced it is not.

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  • An illuminated manuscript style drawing of an angel in a yellow archway
    Peter Popoff

    The phoney prophet who profits, disgraced US televangelist Peter Popoff, is back peddling false promises for cash.

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  • A black ghost on a white background
    Professor Djemaro

    A ghost attached to your supernatural veil has foreseen your $700 million Lotto win, according to the letter from spectrologist Professor Djemaro. We think that Professor Djemaro is an apparition himself because the fine print states that the Professor’s identity and photograph are not legally binding.

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  • A square of bright swirling colours (pink, yellow, orange , green, purple and blue) with  small white sparkly stars
    Professor James Golden

    Professor James Golden will use his "psy-technological wave power" to help you win millions on Lotto. What a load of garbage. The scammers behind Professor Golden must be out of their minds to think that people will fall for this rubbish!

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  • A color photograph of the Proffessor in a circle of white stars on a purple background
    Professor Messidor

    Wouldn’t you love to be able to influence whomever you wanted, to know what they were thinking and to control their actions? This is just another useless psychic scam run out of Switzerland. The only thing the Divinor Cross is likely to attract is more psychic scam letters.

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  • A brown leather pouch style bag
    Professor Poona

    Professor Poona is the sole holder of age-old secrets of the “Dream Dust for Money”. “Dream Dust of Money” – yeh, right! Try pure “bulldust”. All you are likely to get for your $81 is a packet of cheap silver glitter and a lifetime of other fake psychic scam letters from Switzerland.

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  • A colour photograph of Rachel in a pink circle
    Rachel

    Dozens of WA ScamNet contributors have received personally addressed letters from Rachel stating they are “one of three people” to receive this year’s prosperity and fortune.

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  • A photograph of the moon with a ring of white light around it set in a blue night sky
    Radia

    This silent movie wannabe will personally do a cosmic intervention which will cost you $48, $64, $80, or $95.  Isn’t it nice that Radia has given you a choice about how much money she will con out of you? Personally we think that even $48 is a lot to pay for a candle and some mumbo jumbo made up by the people behind the Radia scam. Of course, Radia is not real.

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  • A colour photograph of Rebecca
    Rebecca

    Great mystical clairvoyant and international renowned diviner Rebecca was in the process of working with her divining rods on a big investment project for a businessman when . . .  she came into instant telepathic contact with you. Fantastic … you are a lucky person or maybe not.Interestingly, another psychic Rachel (also featured in WA ScamNet) has the same mailing address as Rebecca. It doesn’t take a divining rod to know that if you respond to Rebecca’s offer, you will soon get a letter from Rachel – if you haven’t already got one!

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  • A green leaf
    Rebecca - druid magician

    Rebecca would have you believe if you want natural positive energy to penetrate you and bring you your share of good luck you should also pick a few fragments of plants and post them to her in the envelope. Be kind to your plants and don’t send them to Rebecca in Switzerland and be kinder to yourself by not sending your credit card details, cheque or money order to this scammer.

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  • A gold cross on a chain
    Research Group Concerning the Miracles of Lourdes

    We all would like something or someone to come into our lives and make things better without us having to try very hard ourselves. The people behind scams know it. ….and they play on it. But WA ScamNet has seen this kind of operation again and again, and they all look the same and use the same tricks against you

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  • A woman dressed like a gypsy fortune tellerwith gold jewellery and a glowing crystal ball
    Rose Hart

    Rose Hart of Switzerland is one of several contenders for the dubious honour of the top psychic scam. Her confidential messages "from beyond" to "you and you alone" came to WA ScamNet by the boxful. Each predicted imminent wealth - for a fee. Who could have foreseen that letters from Rose Hart predicting huge winnings would often be followed by an opportunity to invest in an overseas lottery or prize draw?

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  • Colourful lotto balls bouncing on a white background
    Ryan Willor

    Ryan is not a real person. The name was registered as a trademark by UK company, Lancore International Limited, in September 2005. This letter has probably been sent to thousands of people around the globe, not the seven people the letter states. If you respond to this scam, the only thing you are guaranteed of receiving is more scam psychic letters.

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  • A pupil and blue iris on a white background
    Sandra Rochefort

    Have you ever wanted good fortune, money, happiness and a youthful glow?  This is close to everyone’s dream but Sandra Rochefort claims she has some divine powers to help you achieve this. Don’t be fooled by her trickery, especially if it is just a computer inserting your name in key spots through the letter.  Save your money and invest in your own future. 

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  • A pottery astrological circle marking the passage of the zodiac signs in gold and blue
    Sara Freder

    Sara Freder uses the hook of a free horoscope email to get you in, then harasses you for her paid services and can even take money out of your bank account.

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  • An amethyst pendant in the shape of an octagon
    Senora Diaz - Swiss Clairvoyant

    There is no cheque or prize, just a load of VERY fine print novelly printed on the inside of the envelope. What you are actually getting if you are silly enough to respond is a "magical octagonal talisman" and a "money plus receptor" for just $70. Both are rubbish.

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  • A colour photograph of Angela
    Serena

    Serena’s fine print offers an ‘universal and unconditional guarantee’.  However, the very fine print states that the guarantee is not related to results, just a seven-day cooling off period if you are not satisfied, provided you write back to a specified address. Save yourself the postage and don’t respond.

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  • A square of bright swirling colours (pink, yellow, orange , green, purple and blue) with  small white sparkly stars
    Smaranda

    It’s a shame there is NO truth in anything Smaranda writes. No priest of honour would get involved in a scam like this. And “Mahabo” is actually a city in Burma. Maybe Smaranda meant to write “mumbo jumbo” because that’s all this letter is about. Smaranda has got your name off a mailing list and knows nothing about you.

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  • gold egg
    Sophie Bardot

    Sophie Bardot claims to be the world’s only clairvoyant specialised in money-based games of chance. Sophie’s skills are obviously not up to scratch otherwise she’d know that there are plenty of so-called psychics making similar claims. In fact, WA ScamNet contributors regularly receive letters from so-called gaming wizards peddling lucky lottery grids or booklets.

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  • Dark blue Tanzanite Crystal
    Spectres of Ill Omen Thwarted by Chrystal's Sceptre

    Every now and again a scam comes along which really gets us angry at WA ScamNet, and this is one of those scams. Some of our readers may have seen the Department’s media release on the Sceptre of Atlantis and are already aware of this nefarious scam, but for those who haven’t please read on.

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  • Female hands holding a ball of white light with a blue background
    Supreme Council of 12

    Mikael has written to quite a few WA ScamNet contributors as President of, and on behalf of, the “Supreme Council of 12”, telling them how he and the rest of the Council conducted 7-hour, indepth study into their particular “cases” to come up with “an immediate solution” for each person.  With 29 contributors receiving letters from Mikael in October alone, I wonder if the Supreme Council ever stop to get some sleep……

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  • The swiss flag
    Swiss Institute for Holistic Medicine

    Of all the scams that have come to ScamNet, the mail out from the Swiss Institute for Holistic Living in Switzerland is close to being the most bizarre.

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  • A big pile of Australian $100 notes
    Thomas Lyson

    Self-proclaimed “Money Master Medium” Thomas Lyson claims to be the number one clairvoyant in the USA. And he promises that with the information he supplies, you will break the “Lotto bank”. He even guarantees that you will pocket a minimum of $37,000 every three months. If you fall for this rubbish, the only thing you will break is your own or your partner’s heart at how easily you lost $40!

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  • A scattering of diamonds on a white background
    Tony Williams Johnson

    Tony Williams Johnson, in his email direct to you, sounds like he’s your best friend. He even addresses his email to you – Dear Friend. But don’t be fooled by his empty promise to include you in his father’s $10.2m estate.

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  • A pentagram with trees showing different seasons wound into it
    Vinci - Seven Pentacles of Happiness

    Really, this letter from Vinci (who quite probably doesn’t actually exist) is nothing more than a sales pitch designed to sell you something that the fine print says the company doesn’t guarantee the success of…

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  • A pottery astrological circle marking the passage of the zodiac signs in gold and blue
    Zolar

    Wow, a double money back guarantee! The only problem with the guarantee and Zolar’s promises is a carefully worded fine print “note” which reads: “The information in this letter is provided to you for entertainment purposes only, and nothing that is expressed or implied in letter should be construed as having pre-knowledge or paranormal, mystical or psychic information pertaining to you and/or a family member.” 

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