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Unexpected prize & lottery scams

Unexpected prize and lottery scams work by asking you to pay some sort of fee in order to claim your prize or winnings from a competition or lottery you never entered.

How this scam works

You will receive notification that you have won a lot of money or a fantastic prize in a competition, lottery or sweepstake that you don’t remember entering.  The contact may come by mail, telephone, email, text message or social media.

The prize you have ‘won’ could be anything from a tropical holiday to electronic equipment such as a laptop or a smartphone, or even money from an international lottery.

To claim your prize, you will be asked to pay a fee. Scammers will often say these fees are for insurance costs, government taxes, bank fees or courier charges. The scammers make money by continually collecting these fees from you and stalling the payment of your winnings.

Alternatively the scammer will collect a premium rate on the phone number you are asked to dial (usually starting with 190). They will try to keep you on the line for a long time in order to clock up a hefty charge, and may even ask you to call a second premium rate number.

The email, letter or text message you receive will ask you to respond quickly or risk missing out. It may also urge you to keep your winnings private or confidential, to ‘maintain security’ or stop other people from getting your prize by mistake. Scammers do this to prevent you from seeking further information or advice from independent sources.

Lottery scams may use the names of legitimate overseas lotteries (often Spanish lotteries), so that if you do some superficial research, the scam will seem real. Some examples of the real Spanish lotteries that the scammers falsely use are Loteria Primitiva and El Gordo.

Real examples of lottery scams:

You may also be asked to provide personal details to prove that you are the correct winner and to give your bank account details so the prize can be sent to you. Scammers use these details to try to misuse your identity and steal any money you have in your bank account.

Sometimes the scammers actually do send a cheque for part of your winnings, such as a few thousand dollars of winnings, to trick you into thinking the offer is legitimate. However this cheque will eventually bounce and you will not receive any real payments.

The scammer will take your payment and fail to deliver the prize, or send you something that falls short of the promised prize.


List of Scams

  • money going down a drain
    Spanish lottery (El Mundo or El Gordo)

    In this scam, an email or letter arrives claiming you have won tens of thousands of dollars in a Spanish Lottery you have never heard of. Look out for the El Mundo Spanish Lottery Sweepstake notification, which is a carbon copy of the El Gordo lottery scam.

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  • Sparking Sword Vacation and White Hunter Vacation

    The latest scratchie scam comes from Sparking Sword Vacation and White Hunter Vacation, claiming to be a 12th anniversary promotion.

    Read More...
  • Colourful lotto balls bouncing on a white background
    Lotterywest scams

    An email using the Lotterywest logo and other unauthorised images has been received by many WA consumers advising them of a bogus Lotto win.

    Read More...
  • Australian $ 50 note
    Woolworths $50 survey

    We’ve heard reports of Western Australians receiving an email claiming to be from Woolworths  and asking the recipient to fill in a survey in exchange for a $50 credit to the person’s account (referring to the supermarket’s Everyday Rewards Card).

    Read More...
  • London Olympic symbol
    Olympics Lottery – UK National Lottery

    As athletes train and London gears up for hosting a global sporting event, there’s another group busy at work in the run up to the Olympics 2012 – scammers! Don’t let these fraudsters play games with you and your hard earned cash.



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  • An iPod with head phones
    Facebook Splash Lottery

    Social networking sites aren’t always as friendly as they seem. While they can help you meet new people online, catch up with the latest goss and find friends from long ago, some of these sites are also targeted by scammers trying to make money out of you.

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  • Chevron Logo
    Chevron Oil Contract Award Proposal

    An email purportedly from the Chairman of “Chevron Oil Company” in South Africa has been received by consumers with what seems a lucrative business proposition.

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  • Australian money spinning down the drain
    Vital Prize Information Fulfilment

    You’ve received a letter which is ‘official registration confirmation’ for a pre-approved amount of ‘over $2,149,538.00’.  All you have to do is pay $30 by cash, cheque or postal order.Stop! Read the terms and conditions.

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  • Colourful lotto balls bouncing on a white background
    Overseas Lottery

    If you receive an email or a letter in a similar vein claiming you have won money in an overseas lottery you have never entered, do not respond. This is an advance fee fraud also known as Nigerian scam.

    Read More...
  • A pile of gold coins and gold bars on a white background
    1 November 2017
    AAG Winnings Administration Association

    Wow, it looks like you have hit the jackpot and have won one of the three prizes:  Wrong! The “Super Prize” is actually a discount voucher worth $23 to purchase the “Miraculous Bark from the Tree of Makoo”.

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  • a pile of lottery tickets with a pen
    ACP

    ACP claims it has great news for you. Unfortunately, the only "great" news is that you are on a scammer's mailing list.

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  • The Australian money notes spread out in a fan
    Act of God Awards

    God help us from scam letters like this:

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  • Australian money spinning down the drain
    Australian International Lottery

    Wouldn’t it be nice to be told you have won $200,000? Not if the email is from the Australian International Lottery Program. The only money you’ll see is the money you waste sending it to these scammers.

    Read More...
  • A pile of gold coins
    Aus Prize Disbursement Agency

    Previously WA ScamNet told you about a scam called "Payment Processing Bureau" whose mail address was PO Box 609, Elland, HX5 9DN, United Kingdom. Would anyone like to guess the return postal address for this scam...?

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  • a hand holding a pencil and filling in a lotto ticket
    Australian Lottery Corporation

    WA ScamNet normally warns Australian consumers about fraudsters trying to con people out of their money by using the names of UK and Spanish lotteries.

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  • The Canadian flag
    AustroCanadian Lottery

    AustroAmerican Jackpot is supposedly run by AustroCanadian Lottery. Never heard of it – nor has Lotterywest and it supposedly shares its Osborne Park head office with this outfit. 

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  • Australian money spread out filling the image
    Award Distribution Independent Committee (ADIC)

    WA ScamNet believes the Blacktacos Marketing Company is behind this latest scam involving the very generous Mr Smith who has set up a “Savings Investment Allowance” for the recipient who must claim the money.  And the first cheque is ready to be sent now!

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  • A hand holding five Australian $100 notes
    Award Notification Commission

    Award Notification Commission suggests that you are the winner of one million dollars. They even suggest you seek advice from a financial professional on how to spend your windfall. Unfortunately, the only windfall you are likely to receive is a windfall of other similar misleading offers.

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  • A big pile of australian 100 dollar notes
    Award Notification Service

    This Award Notification Service has been delegated the responsibility of contacting you regarding cash and prize awards totalling in excess of $600,324.50 for which your selection and eligibility has been verified and confirmed. Luckily the WA public are too wary to send money to a company in the UK on the basis of a tiny letter that doesn't even tell them what they'd be getting...!



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  • Australian money spinning down the drain
    Awards Allocation Bureau

    What the Awards Allocation Bureau should have said up front is that there is a one in a million chance of winning the cash prize of $10,000.00 (assuming it exists).

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  • A large wheel lock on a bank vault
    Bank Vault

    The popular television program Seinfeld coined the expression “put it in the vault” meaning to keep something a secret. Well, WA ScamNet wishes that Bank Vault would put its offer in the “vault” and stop bombarding Western Australian consumers with its silly offer.

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  • A red passport in a denim pocket
    B.C.O.A. Official Confirmation of Allocation Bureau

    The black-hearted Blacktacos are at it again, this time trying to peddle Richard Von Struck’s “Guaranteed Winnings Method”. Read the fine print and it states you have only “won” the chance to enter a competition where the first prize is $30,000.

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  • A dark wood, wooden chest full of gold coins
    BGAR Bureau Gral d'allocation des Recompenses

    "You are the person declared a winner in our giant cheque for $15,000 game," the letter from Bureau Général d'allocation des Récompenses (BGAR) states. If you send $50 (which you don’t have to do to enter the competition) you receive the “Extraordinary Gaming Method”, another worthless lucky numbers formula.

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  • a pen writing on a check
    Bio Sana

    The ‘Winning Certificate’ from Bio Sana certainly gives the strong impression that you’ve won AU$14,000. Just send back the ‘Prize Demand’ to claim your special remittance cheque. Would you trust a company making these miraculous claims when they’ve been so devious about the prize win? Think twice about this one.

    Read More...
  • a gold letter slot with mail sticking through it on a white background
    Blacktacos

    The Blacktacos mail orders sales company is one of the most prolific serial scammers known to WA ScamNet.WA ScamNet have nicknamed the company the “black-hearted Blacktacos” because it brazenly sends out the same type of scam under more than a dozen different names. It preys on people’s vulnerabilities by promising riches beyond their dreams in return for a small amount, typically around $50.

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  • A gold sun charm on a gold chain on a white background
    Brooks & Company Ltd

    Getting an expensive piece of jewellery just as a reward for shopping is an incredible offer.  Much too incredible!

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  • Pile of Australian money
    Cash Affiliates & Disbursements

    Cash Affiliates & Disbursements have an appropriate acronym “CAD” because the people behind this letter are cads.

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  • a pen writing on a check
    BIVR

    BIVR President Bernard Baker apologises for not sending you a cheque worth $103,917.39. Apparently it was refused because of “legislative reasons”. Is BIVR trying a different spin on the old “the cheque is in the mail” scam? Or are the scammers behind BIVR so contemptuous of their victims that they believe people will fall for any old nonsense?

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  • Complex mathematical sums
    CAMSE

    CAMSE have declared you a unique winner of $22,500. WA ScamNet suggests you are not unique in this instance because the scammers behind this ruse have sent countless unique people across the world the same cheque, with the same false promises.

    Read More...
  • A brown leather saddle on a white background
    Canadian Prize Award Cowboy

    The “Canadian prize award cowboy” is a one-trick pony – using the same ploy of a $10,000 prize win to trick you into paying $40 for junk jewellery.

    Read More...
  • a hand holding a pencil and filling in a lotto ticket
    Carter, Hammond and Pierce

    Carter, Hammond and Pierce from Canada are holding a portfolio amount worth $1,491,600 addressed to you. If you send off your $30, all you are likely to receive is a list of lotteries and competitions you can enter. The CHP letter is all smoke and mirrors. It talks about monies which you are eligible for, not monies you have won.

    Read More...
  • Australian money spinning down the drain
    Cash Acquisition Resources

    Scammers love to threaten that you will miss out on money if you don’t respond immediately.

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  • Pile of Australian money
    Cash Alert

    Cash Alert LLC (CAL) claims time is running out for you to be a potential winner of $1,100,000. So how does it explain the fact that seventeen other companies are plugging the same scam, use the same terms and conditions, and have similar mailing addresses in Fort Langley, British Columbia, Canada?

    Read More...
  • A silver surround sound system
    Cash/Asset Management Services

    The ‘Notice of Property Resolution’ from Cash/Asset Management Services says you are one of a limited number of international consumers in a cheque/merchandise incentive offer. A similar scam letter doing the rounds from International Payments Centre also lists the same address. We don’t believe it is a coincidence.

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  • A green cauldron style pot full of gold coins
    Cash Contribution Contest

    You receive a letter with the bold headings “Urgent message from financial director “ and “Notice of intent to deliver cash”. The letter looks like an official invoice complete with a stamp, bar code and ID number. But looks can be deceiving. This letter is nothing more than a ploy to get you to spend your hard earned cash on a competition that will not be judged for a year.

    Read More...
  • The Australian money notes spread out in a fan
    Cash-telegram Delivery Service

    This scam is as redundant as its name "Cash-telegram Delivery Service". Yes, your life would change if you had won $2,000,000. But that is not what you will get for your $20. All you will get is a report detailing free sweepstakes or competitions you might be eligible to enter.

    Read More...
  • a gold letter slot with mail sticking through it on a white background
    CDM

    The black-hearted Blacktacos mail order company are at it again, using the name CDM or Club of the Millionaires.

    Read More...
  • a pile of lottery tickets with a pen
    Central Assets Holding Company

    A WA consumer, who sent off their money to Carter Hammond and Pierce, received a cheap photocopied booklet listing web-based sweepstake and prize giveaways. The consumer was ineligible to enter the sweepstake offering $1 million but could be in the running to win a bottle of intestinal cleanser! Second prize was $5 off a bottle of intestinal cleanser!

    Read More...
  • A hand swiping a credit card though an eftpos machine
    Centre International des Gains of Switzerland

     So, what do you do when someone tells you that you have won a prize in a competition you did not enter? (a) Send your credit card details to someone you have never heard of before in another country? OR (b) Send the material post free to WA ScamNet?


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  • A hand holding five Australian $100 notes
    Chase Wilton & Weede

    Bryce Andrew Weede, director of Chase Wilton & Weede, is pleased to inform you in his letter that his records show that you have been assigned a payment code and are the designated recipient of a guaranteed cash payment. He even provides you with a return envelope so you can claim your prize. But if you read the fine print, using the return envelope waives your right to the cash prize!

    Read More...
  • Colourful lotto balls bouncing on a white background
    Cheque Award Reservation Centre (CAR)

    Don’t be taken for a ride by C.A.R (Cheque Award Reservation Centre).

    Read More...
  • a hand holding a pencil and filling in a lotto ticket
    C.H.P.

    Monetary compendium kings Carter, Hammond and Pierce have become so well known as scammers that they are now sending out letters under the initials C.H.P.

    Read More...
  • A pile of gold coins and gold bars on a white background
    CIDP

    The mysterious multimillionaire Mr X knows quite a bit about you, according to the C.I.D.P. letter. WA ScamNet does know the identity of Mr X and we are prepared to share it with you – at ABSOLUTELY NO COST. Mr X is actually an imaginary character created by the infamous Blacktacos, a mail order sales company.

    Read More...
  • A green cauldron style pot full of gold coins
    Consolidated Award Services

    NOW READ THE INFORMATION ON THE BACK you  put in a claim agreeing to participate only in the sweepstakes and agree that your name, address, and photo can be used for promotional campaigns Your odds at winning the $10,000 is 1:5,000,000 You must answer a mathematical skill-testing question in order to be declared a winner, (that’s once you have beaten 499,999,999 people to the prize)

    Read More...
  • Contest America publishers logo
    Contest America Publishers

    Contest America Publishers makes it sound all too easy – answer a simple question and you could win thousands of dollars. But is it worth paying money to enter a contest outside Australia’s jurisdiction, which offers a relatively small prize which will not be awarded for up to two years? You might be better off trying your luck with Australian Lotto or buying your own puzzle book! 

    Read More...
  • A news paper with a pen and glasses lying on top of it
    Cornerstone Financial Group

    Cornerstone Financial Group is a recycled version of the Goode, Walker and Company scam.

    Read More...
  • Australian money spinning down the drain
    Corporate Prize Headquarters

    WA ScamNet advises you to “deep-six” this letter because you will not be a rich person by wasting your money on scams. All you will get for your money is a list of sweepstakes you can enter.

    Read More...
  • a pen writing on a check
    CPBR (Legislative Bank Payments Commission)

    CPBR (Legislative Bank Payments Commission) announces that you will receive a payment for "$50,000 minimum by cheque in your name". One thing is for sure: if you respond you will receive other misleading  letters just like this one.

    Read More...
  • A gold classic style crown with embedded jewels
    Crown Imports

    Crown Imports, also known as Crown Imperial Imports, has been doing the rounds for years. They claim you are the recipient of one of the major items listed - from big TVs to cash, cameras, computers, and jewellery. Just send off your $30 or $40 release fee. But it's all a sham. What you are more likely to receive is some cheap, low quality product such as jewellery or a leather wallet set which will be worth far less than the money you send.

    Read More...
  • A hand holding a dirty red football and a large number of Australian $50 notes on a whitebackground
    CSGF Grand Finalists Select Club

    The black-hearted Blacktacos is trying to con you out of your money with the N. Kingston method. It’s a shame that the Blacktacos don’t abide by their own moral charter because scamming money out of innocent people by making false representations is both reprehensible and illegal!

    Read More...
  • red dice rolling
    Davenport & Associates

    From the city famous for gambling, Las Vegas, comes the latest con to rob you of your money by making you believe that you have won millions of dollars in prizes.

    Read More...
  • Colourful lotto balls bouncing on a white background
    Deaf Lotto International Program

    Internet scammers have no shame!  Now they are targeting the disabled, in particular the deaf in our community, with promises of a huge Lotto win.

    Read More...
  • Pile of Australian money
    Direct Account Enhancement Inc

    You have been confirmed to receive the “full syllabus amount” of $1,200,000. This is the same offer made by 17 other scams operating out of three PO Boxes in Fort Langley, BC, Canada.

    Read More...
  • A pile of gold coins
    Direct Payment (Direct Paimement)

    It is a dream for many people to win the ultimate jackpot in a lottery or just a small slice. Many scammers, including Direct Payment, pray on these dreamers.

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  • A dark wood, wooden chest full of gold coins
    Direct Riches Contest

    Direct Riches claims it’s not a sweepstake, lottery, chance promotion or telemarketing.

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  • a pen writing on a check
    Dominion Entitlement - Cheque Disbursement Centre

    This outfit sends your "certification of prize payment certificate" offering you US$5,000 for a mere US$26 processing fee.

    Read More...
  • The planet earth on a white background
    E-Global Enterprises

    Cash, cars, cameras, computers, compact discs, camcorders - E-Global Enterprises claims you qualify for one of these fantastic prizes.

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  • Three greeting cards one with an image of a wand on it , one with a picture of a pink present and the last one with a bunch of love hearts.
    E-greeting card scam

    You’ve just received a notification that someone has sent you an e-greeting card. Don’t be tempted to open it! Scammers have jumped on the popularity of free electronic greeting or post cards, using them to infect your computer with malicious software.

    Read More...
  • Australian money spinning down the drain
    Emirates Lottery

    The United Arab Emirates might be a rich country but we doubt that even the Emirates can afford to give away millions of dollars in a free lottery competition.

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  • Colourful lotto balls bouncing on a white background
    Email lottery scams

    Email lottery scams operate under various names including infra-pay.com, Sponsor Bingo Loterij Agency, SKY Lotto and Euro (Eurosport) Raffle Draw. The emails claim that your email address was entered in a lottery and you have won big money. To claim the money you must email the person listed at the end of the letter. Promoters often use the legitimate names of lotteries conducted in other countries.

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  • A gold sun charm on a gold chain on a white background
    Emilie Paul

    This is another product promotion campaign under the guise of a contest to win $15,300 or jewellery.

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  • a pile of lottery tickets with a pen
    Euro-lottery

    Apparently Euro-Lottery have been running a major promotional campaign in Australia and their computer system chose 1,500 people to be part of their first draw as part of their campaign. How nice of them to enter you into a contest you never asked for.

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  • Australian money spread out filling the image
    Euromillions lottery scam

    “Congratulations. Your name was attached to a ticket which drew the Euromillion lucky numbers. You have won EUR 667,248.26 in the second draw category.” But WA ScamNet can advise that the only thing you have won is a chance to lose big money in an advance fee fraud.

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  • A pile of gold coins
    Euro Millones International Lottery

    Misspellings often spell a scam and that’s certainly the case with the “massage” (we think that should be message) from Euro Millones International Lottery.

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  • A big pile of australian 100 dollar notes
    European Lottery Guild

    European Lottery Guild is offering you an opportunity to cash in on three of Europe’s most “spectacular multi-million-Euro Lottos: the official state lottos of France, Spain and Germany”.

    Read More...
  • A pile of gold coins and gold bars on a white background
    European Prize Allocations Commission

    In a sneaky attempt to retrieve your personal details and of course, your money, the European Prize Allocations Commission wants you to believe you have a real chance at winning thousands of dollars.

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  • A big pile of Australian $100 notes
    Eva Lorca

    Eva Lorca brings you a prize that doubles your winnings! WA ScamNet contributors have guessed that if misleading mail like this was sent from Australia, the sender would be prosecuted. So they send it post free to WA ScamNet instead. Well done, and thank you!

    Read More...
  • A gold sun charm on a gold chain on a white background
    Fedder and Brothers Partnership

    "This office takes pleasure in notifying you that you are a guaranteed cash prize recipient in the Fedder & Brothers Partnership's International Cash Sweepstakes, and we urgently request that you return the enclosed Form 2719, bearing your personal Cash Claim Number BX321 0730044484 immediately, allowing us to rush your cash prize to you by International air post."

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  • The planet earth on a white background
    Federation Internationale d'Attribution de Gains (FIAG)

    Sounds to good to be true... It is...The fine print (which has been reproduced below) says that this will enter you in the draw for the check and that this promotion is purely aimed at attracting customers' attention to various goods...the worst part of the fine print says that if, for some reason, the draw has to be cancelled, the organisers don't owe you anything.

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  • FIFA World Cup 2010 logo with the FIFA trophy next to it
    FIFA World Cup Lotto

    Scammers are hoping to score a goal with this email claiming to be from the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA).

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  • A scattering of diamonds on a white background
    Foundation Mondiale d'Attribution des Gros Gains

    Firstly, you are DEFINITELY not a person to IMMEDIATELY receive a CHECK for $30,000 and you have to send $60.00 to cover administration and delivery.

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  • a gold letter slot with mail sticking through it on a white background
    Fort Langley Sweepstake Reports

    The Fort Langley mob is an audacious and misleading lot.

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  • A yellow envelope seen from behind
    Fortune Fever

    Answer a question and hand over your money.

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  • a gold letter slot with mail sticking through it on a white background
    Fuchs, Getman, Schmidt & Werner

    The letter warns that this promotion may be under different creative presentations. Dare we suggest the following names which all offer “sweepstakes reports” with Fort Langley return addresses.

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  • A pile of blue spiral bound notebooks
    Gains Academy or G/A Winnings Academy

    If you wake up to a letter in the post saying “you have definitely been declared the only person to have won $107,600.00”, sorry but your dreams of winning big money haven’t come true.

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  • The German flag
    German Lotto syndicates

    The great Australian dream of winning Lotto is what these scammers are banking on. If you are going to play lotto then stick with the government regulated system in Australia. Profits from the Australian lotto system go to legitimate charities that help fellow Australians and  not into the pockets of scammers.

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  • A cardboard electronics box
    Giveaway hoax email

    An email arrives in your inbox claiming that a major electronics manufacturer is trying word-of-mouth advertising to introduce its products.This is a hoax email. There are various versions of this email offering electronic goods, crates of champagne, gift vouches and even cash.

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  • The planet earth on a white background
    Global Wealth Reporters

    Global Wealth Reporters claim you have the opportunity to receive up to $2,005,944. It doesn’t matter what version of the letter you receive. All you will get for your money is a booklet containing lists of prize draws, lotteries, contests and other promotions you can enter. Is this really good value for your money?

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  • a hand holding a pencil and filling in a lotto ticket
    Global Win Office

    Global Win Office of the Netherlands claims you have won a cash prize in a lottery with a jackpot of $60,000.

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  • A green cauldron style pot full of gold coins
    Goldrush Sweepstakes Release

    Don't be taken in by the Goldrush Sweepstakes Release (GSR) letter - its just "fool's gold".

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  • A pile of gold coins and gold bars on a white background
    Gold Winning International

    T Weston, the messenger of your happiness, writes from the Netherlands to advise you that they have $242,500 exclusively reserved for you that can be transformed into cash in just 24 hours. Will you receive your personal file?  Will it include $242,500, the key to future happiness?  Or will you have just spent $29.00 to contribute to the future happiness of someone you don’t know from the Netherlands?

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  • A scattering of diamonds on a white background
    Goode, Walker & Company

    Goode, Walker & Company claimed to be acting on behalf of “Worchester Jewelers, London, England” who operated a Worldwide Publicity Sweepstake. The best you are likely to get for your $31.97 is junk jewellery worth a fraction of the cost of the processing fee.

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  • The Canadian flag
    Greenfield Associates

    Like a rich spicy dish, some scams keep repeating.  A Canadian based group,  Greenfield Associates claim to offer the lucky recipients of their unsolicited letters a cash award of US$10,000 or, if you’re prepared to wait a little longer, ten annual payments of US$1,138.71.

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  • Australian money spinning down the drain
    Gros Lot Gagner

    Gros Lot Gagner claims you are the unique prize winner of a cheque for $22,500.

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  • The Australian money notes spread out in a fan
    Harris & Witherspoon

    This is a Canadian sweepstake, posted in bulk from Singapore.  

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  • a pile of lottery tickets with a pen
    Hauser, Gottesman & Associates

    Hauser, Gottesman & Associates claim a dossier of cash and prizes worth $2,365,603 has your name on it. This is the same offer made by 17 other scams operating out of three PO Boxes in Fort Langley, BC, Canada.

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  • Australian money spread out filling the image
    Hemstead, Rosen & Cornwell

    Hemstead, Rosen & Cornwell (HRC) have the grand title of identification and claims facilitator whose role is to identify people who have won prize money. HRC state they will refund you money if you are dissatisfied with the report and will take your name off their mailing list. WA ScamNet suggests you take up their offer - it's the only worthwhile statement in this whole proposal!

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  • Australian money spinning down the drain
    Heritage Lottery scam

    Western Australians are receiving email notifications from Heritage Lottery International, United Kingdom, that they have won a cash prize. This email is an advance fee fraud email scam. If you respond, the scammers will start asking you for thousands of dollars in payments to release the money.

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  • Hispanic lotto logo
    Hispanic Classic Lotto Program

    Hispanic Classic Lotto Program claims you are the winner in an international promotions program. You are entitled to claim €546,924. This is an advance fee fraud and if you respond, you will be asked to send money to pay for fees and charges to access your winnings. The scammers may also use your personal details for criminal activity – including accessing your bank account.

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  • a tropical island in the middle of a light blue sea
    Huntington Prize Reports

    The certificate from Huntington Prize Reports notifying you of $900,000 in cash and awards is worthy of being framed – as a prime example of a scam!

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  • The German flag
    ILS German Lotto

    The great Australian dream of winning Lotto is what ILS is banking on. ILS may have seven good reasons for you to send off your winning scratch cards or your credit card details but WA ScamNet has plenty of reasons to advise you not to.

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  • a gold letter slot with mail sticking through it on a white background
    Immediate Wealth Office of Administration

    Immediate Wealth has been sending personally addressed letters to our WA ScamNet contributors notifying them of their $30,000 Prize Entitlement Papers.  At least the contest rules advise that you could be sent additional offers and their mailing list is shared with other firms. Beware!

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  • Two fountain pens on a white background
    Imperial Imports Ltd

    Imperial Imports claims that its official judges have selected you as a "cash award recipient in the US$10,000 Cash Award International Sweepstakes".  Of course the real aim behind this mail out is to flog you the pen set for US$40. Is the pen set really worth the money? We doubt it!

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  • A dark wood, wooden chest full of gold coins
    Independent Fund for the Distribution of Unclaimed Wins

    Promo Direct are in the running for the 2007 “Stupidest Scam Name of the Year” Award with their latest offering – Independent Fund for the Distribution of Unclaimed Wins.

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  • Test tubes with brightly coloured liquid in them (purple, green, yellow, blue, pink and orange)
    Institute of Experimental Research (I.E.R)

    We all know looks can be deceiving and this letter is not an exception to the rule. An exciting piece of mail is delivered to your letterbox with AUS$19,200 CASH emblazoned in bold capitals across the envelope.

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  • Red land rover on a white background
    International Assurance Guaranty

    Winning a brand new Range Rover valued at $110,800 as a prize is certainly fantastic news – if it were true!  The vehicle, or its cash equivalent, is being offered in the latest lottery prize scam circulating by mail.

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  • A brightly coloured (wheel of chance style) wheel with the wheel having stopped  on the win slot
    International Award Payment Centre

    It’s a puzzle why International Award Payment Centre persists in misleading consumers into entering its competitions by claiming they have already won.

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  • Silver and triangle garnet ring  on a white background
    International Awards Bureau

    International Awards Bureau (IAB) has $10,000 up for grabs.Take away the flowery language and what have you got? "Swarovski" is a brand of glass crystal and garnet is a semi-precious stone. A one-carat garnet costs about $5. And white gold plating is, well, plating that will rub off in time.

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  • A diamond pendant on a diamante chain
    International Awards Treasury

    A well presented personally addressed letter informs you are holder of a unique $100,000 cash payment number. Read the details carefully and you’ll discover you haven’t actually won $100,000, just the chance to enter a sweepstake to win $100,000 if you send in your details.

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  • A pile of one dollar and a pile of two dollar coins
    International Centre for Financial Leaders

    Wouldn’t you love to become a member of an exclusive billionaire’s club? Unfortunately you won’t get there by responding to this scam letter.

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  • a pen writing on a check
    International Cheques Clearing House

    International Cheques Clearing House is writing to people to advise a guaranteed US$10,000 payout is still pending.The real aim of the letter is to get you to take up the ‘Class A’ jewellery offer. Since when do genuine diamonds sell for US$34.95? It’s more likely to be genuine crystals and the whole jewellery set is probably not worth much more than your postage costs.

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  • A hand holding five Australian $100 notes
    International Claims Administration

    Just fill out claim form number C11.7US, pop it into the envelope that you have to buy a stamp for, and a share of $133 million US will be on its way to you - NOT. Inspector number #17 who personally seals the envelopes will be looking for another job as WA ScamNet will continue to expose their scam.

     

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  • A brown leather wallet open and empty on a white background
    International Designer World

    When you’re on a good scam, stick to it.  That seems to be the motto of the con artists behind this latest Rossi Milano wallet rort.

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  • A scattering of diamonds on a white background
    International Diamond Association - Unregistered

    A mysterious benefactor offering you money sounds like something out of a Charles Dickens book, but it’s one of the latest postal scams doing the rounds.

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  • Australian money spinning down the drain
    International Express Awards

    International Express Awards (IEA) boldly tells you they are not another “junk mail” letter or a form letter.  IEA may claim their letter is an official awards communication but we know its just another scam letter.

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  • A pile of gold coins and gold bars on a white background
    International Fund for Cash Gains

    A certified and guaranteed cheque for $57,000 is all yours, according to the official looking document from International Fund for Cash Gains (IFCG). Mandatory? Guaranteed? That’s not what the fine print says. It clearly states this letter is an “advertising document” and IFCG “underlines the fact that the document does not contain any firm offer to be eligible for a prize”.

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  • Black leather jacket seen from behind
    International Leather Shop

    International Leather Shop maintains you are the recipient of a cash award of “up to” US$10,000 in the International Publicity Sweepstakes. This mail-out is just about flogging leather goods through the mail. If you really are interested in getting a Fernando Dalie product – check the Internet where we found at least one site selling the same product without the hogwash.

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  • Colourful lotto balls bouncing on a white background
    International Lotto Commission

    Consumers are receiving emails and letters claiming they have won money in the La Primitiva or Primitiva lottery, promotion or sweepstake. Advance fee frauds are very sophisticated operations and the operators are experts in convincing victims that they are legitimate.

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  • The swiss flag
    International Settlements Authority

    The letter from Ontario, Canada notifies: Misleading advertising material like this, if published in Australia, would attract the attention of consumer protection agencies. Customers would be able to get help with any claim.

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  • Three jewels; a ruby, an emerald and a sapphire
    International Shipping & Notification Centre

    "We need your instructions regarding a shipment bearing your name and address." Sometimes the most valuable part of a transaction like this is your name and address (not the jewellery!) Your particulars can be sold to similar companies for their "sucker lists". It is up to you to guard your personal information from misuse.

     

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  • A silver surround sound system
    International Special Offers

    Send $49.95 to International Special Offers in the UK to get a watch (brand unknown) with a diamond chip on its face, but no warranty that you can enforce locally if things go wrong.

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  • a pile of lottery tickets with a pen
    IPD

    The Fort Langley mob are at it again, this time under the name IPD.

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  • fish hook and usb
    IPG Prize Distribution Department (Netherlands)

    You are the winner of the Grand Prize of AUD 90,000 - Guaranteed! That's the hook. Hang on! The line above the headline says, "If your number is the winning number, we'll be able to announce: You are the winner … "That's the line. Where's the sinker?  The letter from the Prize Distribution Department, the "Personal Winner's Notification" or the "Last Notice to Respond to this AUD 65,000 Message!" tells you that: You have not actually won a prize

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  • A four leaf clover on a white background
    Irish National Lottery

    The Luck of the Irish has fallen upon you via email.  Be careful of engaging in any form of interaction with people you don’t know asking for money.   Never believe you have won money from a competition overseas that you did not enter let alone someone using a hotmail account.

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  • An amethyst bead bracelet
    ISS Promo Direct Ltd

    Promo Direct Ltd and ISS are masters of the postal scam.

    Read More...
  • A brightly coloured (wheel of chance style) wheel with the wheel having stopped  on the win slot
    John Latimore Wainwright

    John Latimore Wainwright loves the word definite. WA ScamNet can definitely say this is a scam and you are not the only one that has received this offer.

    Read More...
  • A sack with a dollar sign on it
    Kingston & Strathmore

    A letter from Kingston & Strathmore is recycling a scam last seen in 2007 when Imperial Imports offered the same shonky deal.

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  • A soccer ball with Liverpool football branding on it
    Liverpool Football Club promotion

    Well-known English football club Liverpool has had its name and reputation hijacked in a number of email scams.

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  • Two gold Spanish coins on a white background
    LMGC Worldwide Cash Prizes Foundation

    “Congratulations. You have just been selected as one of the most motivated people amongst tens of thousands who most want to change their life and push luck and the chance to their limits.“Congratulations. You have just been selected from one of the suckers’ lists to receive a worthless offer that won’t change your life and will only leave you poorer.”

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  • Colourful lotto balls bouncing on a white background
    Lottery Emails

    Western Australians must be a lucky lot judging by the mountains of emails landing in our inboxes proclaiming we have won the lottery or an international promotion. The emails use various names and logos to hook you in. Some emails copy legitimate government lottery logos to add legitimacy to the scam.

    Read More...
  • Colourful lotto balls bouncing on a white background
    Lottery Swindle

    This is just another Fake lottery scam. Save your money don't send it to these scammers!

    Read More...
  • A big pile of Australian $100 notes
    Louise Eridan

    “Not long ago, if you remember, you were experiencing a feeling of injustice or anger which overwhelmed you,” writes medium Louise Eridan. It’s a shame this is another work of pure fiction by the mail order sales company Blacktacos.

    Read More...
  • A red car with a fuel pump
    Markham, Donnelly and Associates

    If $9000 would help offset today’s high interest rates and fuel prices, read on. The operators of this scam push hard and fast, telling the reader they are one of two confirmed final recipients. But, Markham, Donnelly and Associates are drawing people into a game of chance, as the small print on the back states.

    Read More...
  • Mc Donalds logo
    McDonald's Paid Survey

    An email from the famous McDonald’s restaurant chain and the promise of some cash for completing a simple customer survey – it’s no wonder consumers are falling for this scam.

    Read More...
  • A pile of gold coins and gold bars on a white background
    Mega Money

    Mega Money is a Scam andinvites you to enter a bogus competition.

    Read More...
  • a pile of lottery tickets with a pen
    Microsoft International Lottery

    The Microsoft International Lottery Board letter claims that you have won a major prize in a competition run sometime ago. It claims that due to a mix up of numbers, the results were not released until recently.

    Read More...
  • A white plate with a fork and colourful pills on it
    Mineralis

    Feel lethargic, tired and irritable or need to shed a few kilos like the TV show Australia’s Biggest Losers? Natural medicine specialist Dr Martinet of Mineralis, Switzerland has just the tonic you need. Clearly we believe all of these claims to be false and designed to part you from your money. Our advice, do not get involved in this scam.

    Read More...
  • a pen writing on a check
    Monetary Controls Office

    The promise to disperse more than a US$1m in cash prizes to a select few direct mail recipients is nothing more than a big hoax.

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  • A big pile of australian 100 dollar notes
    Monetary Prize Payment Agency

    Luckily they all read the Official Rules that told them they had not actually won any money yet, but were invited to enter a draw for the $9,000.00 grand prize, with the odds of winning it being 1:150,000. Like we all don't get enough junk-mail already… If it looks too good to be true, it probably is…!

    Read More...
  • A pile of blue spiral bound notebooks
    Monies Advisory

    "$1,000,000 VERIFIED, CONFIRMED, PROOF POSITIVE", the letter from Monies Advisory proclaims in capital letters. Unfortunately, the only thing that will be in your hands is a cheap booklet detailing a list of sweepstakes and other competitions you might be eligible to enter. The total prize pool of the competitions is more than $1,000,000.

    Read More...
  • Silver and triangle garnet ring  on a white background
    Morgan Samuels Haggerty

    They require a reservation fee from you of US$29.95 (approx $56 Australian) which actually buys you a piece of worthless junk jewellery and ensures whatever details you have provided them will be sent on to other offers...probably also scams.

    Read More...
  • a pile of lottery tickets with a pen
    National Awards Advisory Center

    NAAC is no different. Despite the impression given that you have won big money, you have won nothing! You have to enter the competitions (which have a total prize pool of $768,000) to win anything. Ask yourself, why should you pay money to find out about competitions that you can enter for free?

    Read More...
  • A hand holding five Australian $100 notes
    National Awards Clearinghouse

    So what have you won? From the fine print: "The cash award eligibilities consist of the disbursement of various opportunities for fully vested eligibility to win over US$196,103.11 in cash awards." We don't know either.

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  • A gold sun charm on a gold chain on a white background
    National Awards Commission

    Similar scam to the International Awards Treasury. Our contributors have told us they have never won money in the sweepstake and the jewellery they received was junk jewellery. The only thing you can be guaranteed of is receiving more and more of these offers.

    Read More...
  • A cardboard electronics box
    Net Direct Electronics

    Net Direct Electronics claim you are a cash award recipient in the US$10,000 International Sweepstakes. So what are the chances you will get the US$10,000. No WA ScamNet contributors have ever reported receiving the grand prize. The best you can hope for is US$1.

    Read More...
  • Colourful lotto balls bouncing on a white background
    North American Award Centre

    On first reading, the personally addressed letter seems to proclaim that you are a winner of a major cash prize ($13,200 and upwards). Of course, you haven’t actually won the money, just the opportunity to enter a competition to win the money.

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  • a tropical island in the middle of a light blue sea
    Office of Unallocated Awards at Sweepstakes International

    We are very concerned about attempts to get you to invest in overseas lotteries and sweepstakes.There is little hope of getting your money or doing anything about it if you don't!

    Read More...
  • Bronze Chinese coin
    OGGM Grand Millionaire Winners Office

    It’s a bit rich to call your company “Grand Millionaire Winners Office” when the grand prize is only $30,000.

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  • Red land rover on a white background
    O.M.G.A., Mondial Transport Express

    You have won one of three prizes – a Mitsubishi Montero, a Toshiba 32” Flat Panel HD LCD television or an envelope containing a cash value of $800. Ask yourself why you need to pay $54 to redeem a prize you have won.

    Read More...
  • A pile of books one open on the top
    Opportunities Unlimited Publications Inc

    Opportunities Unlimited Publications Inc appears to operate an unlimited number of contests judging by the number of letters forwarded to WA ScamNet by our contributors.

    Read More...
  • a pen writing on a check
    Organisation Centre of Financial Gain (O.C.F.G)

    The Organisation Centre of Financial Gain (O.C.F.G) should be renamed Organisation Centre of Fraudulent Gains or Scammers Inc.

    Read More...
  • A pile of blue spiral bound notebooks
    Organization for the Worldwide Distribution of Gains

    Wow, you are the unique and exclusive Great Beneficiary of the exceptional sum of $47,500.Read the fine print and you’ll find that this is a promotional offer for the booklet “Recipes to easily win $100.00 to $500.00 per day on the lottery without leaving your home”.

    Read More...
  • A brightly coloured (wheel of chance style) wheel with the wheel having stopped  on the win slot
    ORGG

    ORGG should stand for “outrageous rip-offs guaranteed” because this latest offering from Blacktacos is nothing more than a guaranteed rip-off.

    Read More...
  • A big pile of Australian $100 notes
    ORPB

    A scam letter from an organisation called ORPB in the Netherlands awards consumers $100,000 for the small sum of $45. Funds can be remitted by a draft made payable to “NCS” or by credit card to a post office box.

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  • Pile of Australian money
    OTEP

    Do not be sucked in by the suggested urgency; a requirement for you to respond within 10 days. Also ignore claims there has been a special selection process declaring you as the ‘only’ winner. Truth is, the same letter has probably been sent to thousands of others and you’ll never receive any money in return. But at $30 back for every person who falls for it, you can work out what motivates OTEP, or whoever the senders really are.

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  • Colourful lotto balls bouncing on a white background
    Overseas Subscribers Agent, USA Mega Jackpots

    Overseas Subscribers Agents are ticket sellers for super lotteries such as Euromillions and USA Mega Jackpot.“Be advised that there are deceptive operations that have recently engaged in criminal activities that have misled and materially harmed numerous people, creating scepticism that affects legitimate operations such as OSA and others.”

    Read More...
  • A pile of blue spiral bound notebooks
    P.A.I.D

    A WA consumer, who sent off their money to Carter Hammond and Pierce, received a cheap photocopied booklet listing web-based sweepstake and prize giveaways. The consumer was ineligible to enter the sweepstake offering $1 million but could be in the running to win a bottle of intestinal cleanser! Second prize was $5 off a bottle of intestinal cleanser!

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  • a tropical island in the middle of a light blue sea
    Payment Processing Bureau

    The most curious element is the fact that it uses the exact same return address as the Award Notification Service. So who is running these two offers out of the same post box...?

    Read More...
  • Australian money raining on a man holding an umbrella
    Payment Reporting Systems

    Payment Reporting Systems would have you believe that you are eligible for cash payments worth $5,822,052.63. but has a return address shared by other similar scams - Shannon Airport House in Ireland. Payment Reporting Systems will provide a refund if you are not satisfied (and who wouldn’t be!) and a means of getting off their mailing list. Why not give it a go.

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  • A diamond pendant on a diamante chain
    Payment Resources Group

    You open the letter and there is a fake cheque for US$10,000 with your name written on it. WA ScamNet contributors, who have participated in these types of promotions in the past, have received jewellery that is more at home on the shelves of a $2 Discount Shop then in jewellery shop.

    Read More...
  • a hand holding a pencil and filling in a lotto ticket
    Power Lotto

    Don’t confuse Power Lotto Online Promo Program with Western Australia’s own Lotterywest Powerball. Powerball is a legitimate lottery run by Lotterywest, which operates lotteries in Western Australia with profits going back to the community. Power Lotto Online Promo Program is an advance fee fraud scam with profits going straight into the scammers’ pockets!!!

    Read More...
  • A brown leather wallet open and empty on a white background
    Premium Awards Office

    Why can't this "sponsor" simply advertise their "offers and items" to Western Australian consumers like yourselves the way the vast majority of legitimate traders do...? We'll ask them on your behalf...

    Read More...
  • A pile of one dollar and a pile of two dollar coins
    Prize administration and payments

     why didn't "Prize Administration and Payments" in London simply deduct the $39.99 handling fee and send all our friends just $1,753.96?As usual, fine print on the back contradicts the impression given in headlines on the front. Your handling fee buys an entry into a sweepstakes where you have a one in 250,000 change of winning $1,793.95.

     

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  • Silver and triangle garnet ring  on a white background
    Prize Distribution Commission

    As usual the devil is in the detail. The terms and conditions begrudgingly reveal, There is "no firm offer"; and Only one final grand prize of $25,200 or a piece of valuable jewellery; The Grand Winner’s name, address, photo and voice can be used in advertising without compensation; and Reduction cheques (secondary winners) of $2,520 are valid exclusively for the purchase of an esoteric product called "Centuries-Old Protection of the Grand Masters’.

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  • a hand holding a pencil and filling in a lotto ticket
    Prize Giveaway

    Prize Giveaway Inc claims to be an “authorised” referrer and can direct you to cash entities who can pay sweepstake prizes.You’ll probably find you are ineligible to enter some competitions. Some prize giveaways are run by legitimate retailers wanting to promote their business. Other competitions are conducted by direct marketing companies to get your personal information for mailing lists. Always ask yourself whether the prize is worth you being on yet another mailing list!

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  • a pile of lottery tickets with a pen
    Prize Payments

    “Here, Made-Out to You, is Your Completion Document regarding Payout of the Monies now underway in accordance with the Appointed Issuance dates. This is the same offer made by 17 other scams operating out of three PO Boxes in Fort Langley, BC, Canada.

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  •  A bright red  2011 Porsche Boxster
    Prize Power Promotions

    stay sharp. Don't fall into the trap of sending your hard earned cash in the hope that you will receive a new car or a massive cash payout just by solving a simple puzzle, and always remember: ...if it looks too good to be true, it probably is...!

    Read More...
  • Australian money spread out filling the image
    Prize Settlement Headquarters

    The fine print reveals that all you will get for your hard earned cash is a report detailing competitions and lotteries you may be eligible to enter.This offer is not worth the paper it is printed on.

    Read More...
  • Australian money spinning down the drain
    Prize World Incorporated

    Prize World Incorporated (PWI) believes you are such a “deserving individual” they want to give you a formal compendium “Gift of Honour”.  This is the same offer made by 17 other scams operating out of three PO Boxes in Fort Langley, BC, Canada.

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  • A cardboard box with the words “same day delivery” written on it
    Professional Premiums of Utrecht

    Great Cash and Merchandise Giveaway Ready for Immediate Shipment : But what have you won? The rules on the back of the form explain. The chances of winning the money, the food chopper, the TV and the cookware set are one in forty-eight thousand. Everyone who enters "wins" the cordless vacuum cleaner.

    Read More...
  • a gold letter slot with mail sticking through it on a white background
    Promo Direct Ltd

    Promo Direct Ltd, ISS and B&N are masters of the postal scam.

    Read More...
  • A sack with a dollar sign on it
    Prosperity International

    When you read the Official Rules you are told that the the odds of winning the $6,000.00 in Prosperity International Cash Draw's Category One are 1:500,000. Hang on!  Didn't the letter say you'd already won, but failed to claim the money? If it looks too good to be true, it probably is…!

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  • Four colourful  puzzle pieces blue, yellow green and orange
    Puzzles 4 Cash

    Would you hand over your personal details and $10 for the chance to win $10,000 in the future? It’s no puzzle that this is just another mail scam which you should avoid.

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  • A pile of gold coins
    Quick Cash Contest

    A guaranteed prize amount of $30,000 is yours by answering three questions, or so the organisers behind Quick Cash Contest claim. It’s no puzzle that this is the same scam operating under different names. Don’t waste your money by responding.

    Read More...
  • The Australian money notes spread out in a fan
    Ready Riches Contest

    The competition does not close until next year (July 31, 2007) and money will not be paid out until December 2007. It seems a long time to wait to win a small amount of money in an international competition! WA ScamNet has never heard of anyone winning the grand prize in these competitions.

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  • a pile of lottery tickets with a pen
    Rutger, Feinstein, Rohrbach & Stern Ltd

    Rutger, Feinstein, Rohrbach & Stern have awardable funds totalling $2,540,910 for you. This is the same offer made by 17 other scams operating out of three PO Boxes in Fort Langley, BC, Canada.

    Read More...
  • A diamond pendant on a diamante chain
    Security Dispatch Ltd

    This is just another jewellery promotion campaign. WA ScamNet has never heard of anyone winning the money. All you will receive is a cheap piece of jewellery.

    Read More...
  • a hand holding a pencil and filling in a lotto ticket
    Selective Awards Reporting Agency

    Do you want more paperwork on your “to do” list at home?  Do you want to waste your time filling out entries into an international competition you may not win?  Then have Selective Awards Reporting Agency (SARA) got a deal for you!

    Read More...
  • A thatched roofed holiday resort set around a huge pool; on the coast; near forested mountains
    Sentinel Marketing Group

    A sentinel usually refers to a sentry or guard, sometimes a statue that guards a particular place, person or item, as well as an honour guard.

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  • An amethyst pendant in the shape of an octagon
    SIAL

    When is a cheque for $30,000 not a cheque? When “cheque for $30,000” is the name of a game being peddled by scammers SIAL.

    Read More...
  • mobile phone with a padlock on it
    SMS scams

    Your phone bleeps to alert you that a text message has arrived and when you open the SMS proclaiming a cash or prize win in a promotion you don’t remember entering. If you respond to any of these texts, the scammers will find a way to extort money from you. The money you are paying up-front will not result in you getting anything in return. The only winner will be the person, or people, behind the bogus promotion.

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  • Complex mathematical sums
    S.O.F.T. Society for the Organisation of Fund Transfers

    “All of my heartiest congratulations! The present notice is made out uniquely for your benefit so that you can take immediate possession of the certified cheque that you have truly WON,” so the letter reads.Well, one thing is certain - you won’t become a millionaire by wasting your money on this rubbish!

    Read More...
  • A dark blue car (2007 lotus elise)
    Transglobal Commercial Services

    Notice of Unclaimed Motor Vehicle or other Commercial Goods. What the headline gives, the fine print takes away. Advertising that creates a clear impression, then contradicts this impression in fine print is prohibited by the Fair Trading Act in Western Australia.

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  • A big pile of Australian $100 notes
    Transnational Awards Division

    You receive a personally addressed “official registration confirmation” letter stating more than $2 million in prizes have been identified.

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  • The Canadian flag
    TransNational Trade Consortium of Nova Scotia, Canada

    For between $39.95 and $79.95 per month you are guaranteed to receive some winnings from multiple entries into lottery syndicates operated on your behalf. Do you get to see your ticket numbers before each draw? We couldn't find that bit.


    Read More...
  • A house built out of Australian money
    Transworld Property Repository

    Why do the promoters feel the need to mislead readers into believing they have won something when that is just not true? Send misleading promotional material to WA ScamNet – for the benefit of the entire community.

    Read More...
  • a hand holding a pencil and filling in a lotto ticket
    UK National Lottery Sweepstake

    Western Australians are receiving emails saying they have won a cash prize on the UK National Lottery online Sweepstakes International program. The email looks authentic using official logos and names – but it is an advance fee fraud, which will ask you to pay money to claim your prize.

    Read More...
  • A pile of gold jewellery on a white background
    Willington Pierce Brothers

    Like Phoenix rising from the ashes, the Harris & Witherspoon postal scam has been reborn using a different name.

    Read More...
  • A scattering of diamonds on a white background
    Willoughby and Johnson

    Free jewellery! It costs $80. It's worth $zero.

    Read More...
  • A pile of blue spiral bound notebooks
    Winners Circle

    Photocopied lists of sweepstakes, competition and merchandise offers are the latest “prize” being peddled by scammers. Be warned: the fine print states that Winners Circle may send you different presentations of this offer and may give your details to other companies. Great! Now you can look forward to more scam mail.

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  • a pile of lottery tickets with a pen
    Winners Location Corp/Smithhaven

    Fraudsters must love coming up with new names or phrases to disguise their scams.

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  • A pile of one dollar and a pile of two dollar coins
    Winning Centre $30,000.00 settlement

    The key words in the fine print refer to hundreds of thousands of "entries" in the competition (not your "100% guaranteed cash settlement") and "At times our respondent list is shared with selected firms whose products and mailings may be of interest to you..." What similar mailings would apparently be of interest to you?  More misleading statements about a small fee payable to people you have never heard of, about prizes you have not won, in competitions you did not enter of course

    Read More...
  • A dark blue car (2007 lotus elise)
    Winterthur Asset Company

    A car, camera, computer or cash cheque – Winterthur Asset Company claims you qualify for one of these fantastic prizes. Do you really think that $39.95 is going to get you the Mercedes Benz – we doubt it! You are more likely to receive cheap jewellery, which is not worth the money you sent.

    Read More...
  • A gold medal on a blue and white ribbon
    World Medal of Freedom

    WA ScamNet is very pleased to announce that our very own Consumer Protection Commissioner Patrick Walker has been nominated for "The World Medal of Freedom". WA ScamNet suggests that ABI is just a "vanity" publisher who appeals to people who want a plaque on their wall or see their name in a book, even if the honour has no real credibility. In effect, they have purchased the honour.

    Read More...
  • red dice rolling
    Worldwide Cash Registry

    Worldwide Cash Registry uses old world stationery with a touch of modern day security to try and convince people to part with $30, to be in the running for more than $2 million. WCR have several scams on the go at the same time, using the same name with a different postal address or the same postal address but different a scam.

    Read More...
  • The planet earth on a white background
    World Wide Distribution Centre

    This mob write to you requesting your permission to send you $8,000 on a Request for Delivery Release form which at first glance looks very much like a remittance form used by some legitimate operators. Although we share the news of these con artists with our colleagues overseas it is impossible to get consumers their money back if they fall for their tactics.

    Read More...
  • An amethyst bead bracelet
    WWW.SRC

    WWW.SRC claims you have won $24,000 and the cheque is awaiting your collection. I’m getting a premonition. Are all these organisations and people one and the same? Why do I need to pay money to receive a prize? Read the conditions and it all becomes crystal clear. The prizes on offer are the $24,000 or “a piece of valuable jewellery”.

    Read More...
  • An example of a yahoo and msn scam certificate
    Yahoo Lottery Inc

    Scammers are using the name of one of the world’s biggest Internet companies to fleece people of money in an advance fee fraud email scam.

    Read More...

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